camwhoreconfessional:

audy-teaze:

homotography:

Neil Patrick Harris by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair, May 2014

Jfc…

IT’S A TROUSER SNAKE!!!!

REBLOGGING BECAUSE ACRANTOPHIS DUMERILI.

A message from Anonymous
Lizards do not divorce. They prefer to anole their marriages.

Do you know how lizard gym teachers punish lazy students? They make them dewlaps.

Calling All SSoT Twitter Users

sweetteascience:

Ok, Science Side of Tumblr, who’s got awesome twitters that we should be following? Reblog with your twitter handles!

You can find us at @sweetteascience, @alwaysscience, and @rachelwigginton.

This is a good idea! Follow my science life at @markscherz! My poetry twitter is @pseudoseuss and my pun-dedicated twitter is @suchpun. People I know can also follow me on my personal personal twitter, @the_moof.

A message from Anonymous
Happy birthday! Do Malagasy Hognose Snakes play dead like North American Hognose Snakes?

Thank you!

Not to the best of my knowledge, no. I have seen probably three dozen Leioheterodon snakes in the wild, of all three species, and none of them fein death. This is probably because they are such large snakes; they do a better show of intimidation than playing dead.

Also unlike American ‘colubrid’ (sunsu antiqui) snakes, no Malagasy snakes musk. Their range of defenses is in fact extremely limited.

I would posit that this is mostly due to the relative scarcity of predators - they are at risk from raptors and a few mongoose species, but that’s pretty much it.

Stumpffia be Köhler, Vences, D’Cruze& Glaw, 2010
Distribution:
This species is known only from the eastern side of the Ankarana Special Reserve limestone karst, in northern Madagascar.
Morphology & Colouration:
Stumpffia be is a large species of the typically small stump-toed frogs (genus Stumpffia), reaching a maximum recorded length of 25.2 mm (Malagasy ‘be’ = large). The eyes are large, and the tympanum is distinct, and 2/3rds the width of the eye.
This species possesses distinctly expanded discs at the ends of its well-developed fingers and toes.
The hindlimbs are bright orange-red on their inner and outer surfaces, and there is a distinct orange colour to the axillary region (arm pit).
The dorsal colour is beige with brown markings, strongly contrasting the brown of the loreal region. The throat is whitish with fine dark speckling. The underside of the torso is bluish. The iris is greenish gold.
No males of this species are known, so sexually dimorphic characters are unknown. Juveniles appear to have a series of bright blue spots arranged regularly around the posterior half of their body.
Habits:
Very little is known of the habits of these frogs. They are known to live near streams in the limestone karst formations, and also potentially in caves in the region. Their call is unknown. A single female was found to have traces of black ants in her gut.
Conservation Status:
Stumpffia be is not currently listed in the IUCN Red List. However, a conservation status of Vulnerable was proposed for it by Köhler et al. 2010, due to its apparently very small range, and the potential therefore for rapid population decline due to anthropogenic activity.
Taxonomy:
This species belongs to a group or rather large Stumpffia species from the extreme north of Madagascar, and a subgroup of these containing S. hara, S. be, S. megsoni, and S. staffordi. Among these, it differs from all by its bright orange leg colouration, and also from S. hara and S. megsoni by its more expanded finger tips, and from S. staffordi also by contrasting dorsal and lateral head colouration.
Phylogeny:
Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Microhylidae-Stumpffia-S. be
Photos are of the holotype; the second photo is taken from Köhler et al. 2010.
Click here to see more TaxonFiles!
References:
Köhler, J., M. Vences, N. D’Cruze & F. Glaw (2010) ‘Giant dwarfs: discovery of a radiation of large-bodied ‘stump-toed frogs’ from karstic cave environments of northern Madagascar' Journal of Zoology 282:21-38
Stumpffia be Köhler, Vences, D’Cruze& Glaw, 2010
Distribution:
This species is known only from the eastern side of the Ankarana Special Reserve limestone karst, in northern Madagascar.
Morphology & Colouration:
Stumpffia be is a large species of the typically small stump-toed frogs (genus Stumpffia), reaching a maximum recorded length of 25.2 mm (Malagasy ‘be’ = large). The eyes are large, and the tympanum is distinct, and 2/3rds the width of the eye.
This species possesses distinctly expanded discs at the ends of its well-developed fingers and toes.
The hindlimbs are bright orange-red on their inner and outer surfaces, and there is a distinct orange colour to the axillary region (arm pit).
The dorsal colour is beige with brown markings, strongly contrasting the brown of the loreal region. The throat is whitish with fine dark speckling. The underside of the torso is bluish. The iris is greenish gold.
No males of this species are known, so sexually dimorphic characters are unknown. Juveniles appear to have a series of bright blue spots arranged regularly around the posterior half of their body.
Habits:
Very little is known of the habits of these frogs. They are known to live near streams in the limestone karst formations, and also potentially in caves in the region. Their call is unknown. A single female was found to have traces of black ants in her gut.
Conservation Status:
Stumpffia be is not currently listed in the IUCN Red List. However, a conservation status of Vulnerable was proposed for it by Köhler et al. 2010, due to its apparently very small range, and the potential therefore for rapid population decline due to anthropogenic activity.
Taxonomy:
This species belongs to a group or rather large Stumpffia species from the extreme north of Madagascar, and a subgroup of these containing S. hara, S. be, S. megsoni, and S. staffordi. Among these, it differs from all by its bright orange leg colouration, and also from S. hara and S. megsoni by its more expanded finger tips, and from S. staffordi also by contrasting dorsal and lateral head colouration.
Phylogeny:
Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Microhylidae-Stumpffia-S. be
Photos are of the holotype; the second photo is taken from Köhler et al. 2010.
Click here to see more TaxonFiles!
References:
Köhler, J., M. Vences, N. D’Cruze & F. Glaw (2010) ‘Giant dwarfs: discovery of a radiation of large-bodied ‘stump-toed frogs’ from karstic cave environments of northern Madagascar' Journal of Zoology 282:21-38
Stumpffia be Köhler, Vences, D’Cruze& Glaw, 2010
Distribution:
This species is known only from the eastern side of the Ankarana Special Reserve limestone karst, in northern Madagascar.
Morphology & Colouration:
Stumpffia be is a large species of the typically small stump-toed frogs (genus Stumpffia), reaching a maximum recorded length of 25.2 mm (Malagasy ‘be’ = large). The eyes are large, and the tympanum is distinct, and 2/3rds the width of the eye.
This species possesses distinctly expanded discs at the ends of its well-developed fingers and toes.
The hindlimbs are bright orange-red on their inner and outer surfaces, and there is a distinct orange colour to the axillary region (arm pit).
The dorsal colour is beige with brown markings, strongly contrasting the brown of the loreal region. The throat is whitish with fine dark speckling. The underside of the torso is bluish. The iris is greenish gold.
No males of this species are known, so sexually dimorphic characters are unknown. Juveniles appear to have a series of bright blue spots arranged regularly around the posterior half of their body.
Habits:
Very little is known of the habits of these frogs. They are known to live near streams in the limestone karst formations, and also potentially in caves in the region. Their call is unknown. A single female was found to have traces of black ants in her gut.
Conservation Status:
Stumpffia be is not currently listed in the IUCN Red List. However, a conservation status of Vulnerable was proposed for it by Köhler et al. 2010, due to its apparently very small range, and the potential therefore for rapid population decline due to anthropogenic activity.
Taxonomy:
This species belongs to a group or rather large Stumpffia species from the extreme north of Madagascar, and a subgroup of these containing S. hara, S. be, S. megsoni, and S. staffordi. Among these, it differs from all by its bright orange leg colouration, and also from S. hara and S. megsoni by its more expanded finger tips, and from S. staffordi also by contrasting dorsal and lateral head colouration.
Phylogeny:
Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Microhylidae-Stumpffia-S. be
Photos are of the holotype; the second photo is taken from Köhler et al. 2010.
Click here to see more TaxonFiles!
References:
Köhler, J., M. Vences, N. D’Cruze & F. Glaw (2010) ‘Giant dwarfs: discovery of a radiation of large-bodied ‘stump-toed frogs’ from karstic cave environments of northern Madagascar' Journal of Zoology 282:21-38

Stumpffia be Köhler, Vences, D’Cruze& Glaw, 2010

Distribution:

This species is known only from the eastern side of the Ankarana Special Reserve limestone karst, in northern Madagascar.

Morphology & Colouration:

Stumpffia be is a large species of the typically small stump-toed frogs (genus Stumpffia), reaching a maximum recorded length of 25.2 mm (Malagasy ‘be’ = large). The eyes are large, and the tympanum is distinct, and 2/3rds the width of the eye.

This species possesses distinctly expanded discs at the ends of its well-developed fingers and toes.

The hindlimbs are bright orange-red on their inner and outer surfaces, and there is a distinct orange colour to the axillary region (arm pit).

The dorsal colour is beige with brown markings, strongly contrasting the brown of the loreal region. The throat is whitish with fine dark speckling. The underside of the torso is bluish. The iris is greenish gold.

No males of this species are known, so sexually dimorphic characters are unknown. Juveniles appear to have a series of bright blue spots arranged regularly around the posterior half of their body.

Habits:

Very little is known of the habits of these frogs. They are known to live near streams in the limestone karst formations, and also potentially in caves in the region. Their call is unknown. A single female was found to have traces of black ants in her gut.

Conservation Status:

Stumpffia be is not currently listed in the IUCN Red List. However, a conservation status of Vulnerable was proposed for it by Köhler et al. 2010, due to its apparently very small range, and the potential therefore for rapid population decline due to anthropogenic activity.

Taxonomy:

This species belongs to a group or rather large Stumpffia species from the extreme north of Madagascar, and a subgroup of these containing S. hara, S. be, S. megsoni, and S. staffordi. Among these, it differs from all by its bright orange leg colouration, and also from S. hara and S. megsoni by its more expanded finger tips, and from S. staffordi also by contrasting dorsal and lateral head colouration.

Phylogeny:

Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Microhylidae-Stumpffia-S. be

Photos are of the holotype; the second photo is taken from Köhler et al. 2010.

Click here to see more TaxonFiles!

References:

Köhler, J., M. Vences, N. D’Cruze & F. Glaw (2010) ‘Giant dwarfs: discovery of a radiation of large-bodied ‘stump-toed frogs’ from karstic cave environments of northern Madagascar' Journal of Zoology 282:21-38

Furcifer pardalis

30350j:

Cute gecko belly!!

Uroplatus fimbriatus

Boophis tasymena, the red-spotted treefrog from eastern Madagascar. 

Photo by leopardcat.

wesleylock:

I don’t like drugs because I don’t like being artificially stimulated to feel something that isn’t real.

The highs of most drugs will fade, the memory of true adventures will last forever.

And nothing that drugs could make you feel is better than a beautiful reality.

I also like knowing that if anything ever doesn’t make sense according to the typical laws of nature, I will know that either I have been drugged, I am hallucinating, or The End is nigh.

As of two hours ago, I am officially 8400 days old; 1200 weeks old; 300 months old; 23 years old.

reptilesrevolution:

Uroplatus sikorae

liveblogging-depression:

markscherz:

Someone asked what the lettering on the scarf was. Here is a better photo of both sides.

The letters are Elvish, of an ancient mode, but the language is that of Mordor, which I will not utter on my blog.

It is double-knit such that the lettering is correctly oriented and legible on both sides.

It is currently 25,700 stitches. When it is finished, it will be about 70,000.

… alright I’m a bad person who isn’t going to google.
Double-knit meaning you’re knitting both sides independently so that it has two layers that you’re attaching? because htat’s badass.

Actually no, double knitting means knitting both sides at the same time. You work both colours simultaneously. Every bit of contrasting colour is where I have swapped over from the other side. There is no stitching together involved. It becomes a double-layered single piece that cannot be pulled apart.