Squamate sociality: surprisingly like birds and mammals

I love the quizzical looks I often get in response to Social Snakes followed by “But snakes aren’t social…”
Au contraire, indeed they are, as are many lizards (together termed squamates) and their social behavior is more like birds and mammals than many guess!
We are just starting to learn about snake sociality, but the lizard behaviorists, and Aussies in particular, are way ahead of us. Here are just a few especially cool examples of complex social behavior in the Egernia lizards native to Australia.

Read the rest!
Article by Melissa Amarello as part of RAmBlN's Darwin Day celebration.
Check out the RAmBlN website!
Follow the #HerpsAdapt Darwin Day celebration all week on twitter!
Squamate sociality: surprisingly like birds and mammals

I love the quizzical looks I often get in response to Social Snakes followed by “But snakes aren’t social…”
Au contraire, indeed they are, as are many lizards (together termed squamates) and their social behavior is more like birds and mammals than many guess!
We are just starting to learn about snake sociality, but the lizard behaviorists, and Aussies in particular, are way ahead of us. Here are just a few especially cool examples of complex social behavior in the Egernia lizards native to Australia.

Read the rest!
Article by Melissa Amarello as part of RAmBlN's Darwin Day celebration.
Check out the RAmBlN website!
Follow the #HerpsAdapt Darwin Day celebration all week on twitter!

Squamate sociality: surprisingly like birds and mammals

I love the quizzical looks I often get in response to Social Snakes followed by “But snakes aren’t social…”

Au contraire, indeed they are, as are many lizards (together termed squamates) and their social behavior is more like birds and mammals than many guess!

We are just starting to learn about snake sociality, but the lizard behaviorists, and Aussies in particular, are way ahead of us. Here are just a few especially cool examples of complex social behavior in the Egernia lizards native to Australia.

Read the rest!

Article by Melissa Amarello as part of RAmBlN's Darwin Day celebration.

Check out the RAmBlN website!

Follow the #HerpsAdapt Darwin Day celebration all week on twitter!

  1. kaikoga reblogged this from koryos
  2. reptinerds reblogged this from reptilefacts
  3. stoneclaw reblogged this from thisoverhere
  4. thisoverhere reblogged this from koryos
  5. fewmetsndust reblogged this from reptilefacts
  6. kcassoen reblogged this from reptilefacts
  7. mraoff reblogged this from reptilefacts
  8. think4yaself reblogged this from astrowanderer
  9. cassieevans0998 reblogged this from crotalinae
  10. crotalinae reblogged this from reptilefacts
  11. lizardsandstuff reblogged this from lizardbeans
  12. xubuntuthedragon reblogged this from clockwork-serpent
  13. simplecircuitry reblogged this from reptilefacts
  14. abelisaurslayer reblogged this from reptilefacts
  15. lizardbeans reblogged this from clockwork-serpent
  16. astrowanderer reblogged this from clockwork-serpent
  17. clockwork-serpent reblogged this from reptilefacts
  18. gojirawaffle reblogged this from reptilefacts
  19. snakelips reblogged this from reptilefacts and added:
    Just want to make this clear: Just because many reptiles are in fact social, THIS DOES NOT MEAN YOU CAN HOUSE THEM...
  20. reptilefacts reblogged this from markscherz
  21. almostadorablyinsane reblogged this from enraptored
  22. nostalgicpatter reblogged this from markscherz
  23. jackalkate reblogged this from koryos